Python

pyFreenet 0.4.1 with auto-spawn support in fcpupload

I just put up a new pyFreenet release (github):

If you have Python3 and pip >= 8 you can get it with pip3 install -U --user --egg pyFreenet3. It provides a cleaned up fcpupload script with --spawn support (requires GNU/Linux):

pip3 install -U --user --egg pyFreenet3
echo 1 > testfile
fcpupload --spawn --fcpPort 9486 testfile 

Why Python 3?

At the Institute, we use both Python 2 and Python 3. While researching the current differences (Python 3.5, compared to Python 2.7) I found two beautiful articles by Brett Cannon, the current manager of Python, and summarized them for my work group.

The articles:

  1. Why Python 3: Why Python3 exists
  2. Why use 3: How to pitch Python 3 to Management

The relevant points for us1 are the following:


  1. I have summarized them because I can not expect scientists (or other people who only use Python) to read the full articles, just to decide what they do when they get the channce to tackle a new project. 

Which language is best, C, C++, Python or Java?

My answer to the question about the best language on Quora. If you continue reading from here, please stick with me to the end. Ready to read to the end? Enjoy the ride!

My current answer is: Scheme ☺ It gives me a large degree of freedom to explore ways to program which were much harder hard to explore in Python, C++ and Java. That’s why I’m currently switching from Python to Scheme.1

But depending on my current step on the road to improve my skills2 and the development group and project that answer might have been any other language — C, C++, Java, Python, Fortran, R, Ruby, Haskell, Go, Rust, Clojure, ….

Warum Python3?

Im Institut verwenden wir sowohl Python 2 als auch Python 3. Bei Recherche zu den aktuellen Unterschieden (Python 3.5 im Vergleich mit Python 2.7) habe ich zwei schöne Artikel von Brett Cannon gefunden, dem aktuellen Verwalter von Python, und sie für meine Arbeitsgruppe zusammengefasst.

Die Artikel:

  1. Warum Python 3: Why Python 3 exists
  2. Warum 3 nutzen: How to pitch Python 3 to Management

Die für uns relevanten1 Punkte sind:


  1. Ich habe sie zusammengefasst, da ich nicht erwarten kann, dass Wissenschaftler (oder andere Leute, die Python nur verwenden) die ganzen Artikel lesen, nur um zu überlegen, was sie machen, wenn sie mal wieder ein neues Projekt angehen wollen. 

Python chooses Github, therefore I’m releasing the py2guile PDF for free

py2guile book

Python is the first language I loved. I dreamt in Python, I planned in Python, I thought I would never need anything else.

  Download “Python to Guile” (pdf)

You can read more about this on the Mercurial mailing list.

 - Free: html | pdf
   preview edition
   (complete)

Yes, this means that with Guile I will contribute to a language developed via Git, but it won’t be using a proprietary platform.

Translating a lookup-dictionary to bash: Much simpler than I thought

I wanted to name Transcom Regions in my plots by passing their names to the command-line tool, but I only had their region-number and a lookup dictionary in Python. To avoid tampering with the tool, I needed to translate the dictionary to a bash function, and thanks to the case statement it was much simpler than I had expected.

This is the original dictionary:

Gratis py2guile from Freenet

py2guile book

py2guile is a book I wrote about Python and Guile Scheme. It’s selling at 0.01 ฿ | 2.99 € for the ebook and 14.95 € for the printed softcover.

To fight the new german data retention laws, you can get the ebook gratis: Just install Freenet, then the following links work:

Escape total surveillance and get an ebook about the official GNU extension language for free today!

Going from Python to Guile Scheme - a natural progression

py2guile book

Python is the first language I loved. I dreamt in Python, I planned in Python, I thought I would never need anything else.

 - Free: html | pdf
 - Ebook: 2.99 €
   epub format
 - Softcover: 14.95 €
   with pdf, epub, mobi
 - Source: download
   free licensed under GPL

Freenet Communication Primitives: Part 2, Service Discovery and Communication

Basic building blocks for communication in Freenet.

This is a guide to using Freenet as backend for communication solutions - suitable for anything from filesharing over chat up to decentrally hosted game content like level-data. It uses the Python interface to Freenet for its examples.

Mirror, Freenet Project, Arne Babenhauserheide, GPL
Mirror,
Freenet Project,
License: GPL.

This guide consists of several installments: Part 1 is about exchanging data, Part 2 is about confidential communication and finding people and services without drowning in spam and Part 3 ties it all together by harnessing existing plugins which already include all the hard work which distinguishes a quick hack from a real-world system (this is currently a work in progress, implemented in babcom.py which provides real-world usable functionality).

Note: You need the current release of pyFreenet for the examples in this article (0.3.2). Get it from PyPI:

# with setuptools
easy_install --user --egg pyFreenet==0.4.0
# or pip
pip install --user --egg pyFreenet==0.4.0

This is part 2: Service Discovery and Communication. It shows how to find new people, build secure communication channels and create community forums. Back when I contributed to Gnutella, this was the holy grail of many p2p researchers (I still remember the service discovery papers). Here we’ll build it in 300 lines of Python.

Welcome to Freenet, where no one can watch you read!

Freenet Communication Primitives: Part 1, Files and Sites

Basic building blocks for communication in Freenet.

This is a guide to using Freenet as backend for communication solutions - suitable for anything from filesharing over chat up to decentrally hosted game content like level-data. It uses the Python interface to Freenet for its examples.

TheTim from Tim Moore, licensed under cc by
TheTim
from Tim Moore,
License: cc by.

This guide consists of several installments: Part 1 (this text) is about exchanging data, Part 2 is about confidential communication and finding people and services without drowning in spam and Part 3 ties it all together by harnessing existing plugins which already include all the hard work which distinguishes a quick hack from a real-world system. Happy Hacking and welcome to Freenet, the forgotten cypherpunk paradise where no one can watch you read!

Recursion wins!

I recently read the little schemer and that got me thinking about recursion and loops.

After starting my programming life with Python, I normally use for-loops to solve problems. But actually they are an inferior mechanism when compared to recursion, if the language provides proper syntactic support for that. Since that claim pretty much damns Python on a theoretical level (even though it is still a very good tool in practice and I still love it!), I want to share a simplified version of the code which made me realize this.

Installing Scipy and PyNIO on a Bare Cluster with the Intel Compiler

2 years ago I had the task of running a python-program using scipy on our university cluster, using the Intel Compiler. I needed all those (as well as PyNIO and some other stuff) for running TM5 with the python shell on the HC3 of KIT.

This proved to be quite a bit more challenging than I had expected - but it was very interesting, too (and there I learned the basics of GNU autotools which still help me a lot).

But no one should have to go to the same effort with as little guidance as I had, so I decided to publish the script and the patches I created for installing everything we needed.1

The script worked 2 years ago, so you might have to fix some bits. I won’t promise that this contains everything you need to run the script - or that it won’t be broken when you install it. Actually I won’t promise anything at all, except that if the stuff here had been available 2 years ago, that could have saved me about 2 months of time (each of the patches here required quite some tracking of problems, experimenting and fixing, until it provided basic functionality - but actually I enjoyed doing that - I learned a lot - I just don’t want to be forced to do it again). Still, this stuff contains quite some hacks - even a few ugly ones. But it worked.

Equal-Area Map Projections with Basemap and matplotlib/pylab

PDF (read as slides)

Org (reproduce)

Plotting global equal area maps with python, matplotlib/pylab and Basemap.

Table of Contents

wisp: Whitespace to Lisp

» I love the syntax of Python, but crave the simplicity and power of Lisp.«

display "Hello World!" ↦ (display "Hello World!")
define : factorial n     (define (factorial n)            
    if : zero? n       ↦     (if (zero? n)                
       . 1                      1                      
       * n : factorial {n - 1}  (* n (factorial {n - 1}))))

Wisp basics

»ArneBab's alternate sexp syntax is best I've seen; pythonesque, hides parens but keeps power« — Christopher Webber in twitter, in identi.ca and in his blog: Wisp: Lisp, minus the parentheses
☺ Yay! ☺
with (open-file "with.w" "r") as port
     format #t "~a\n" : read port
Familiar with-statement in 25 lines.

 ↓ skip updates ↓

Update (2017-03-18): I removed the link to Gozala’s wisp, because it was put in maintenance mode. Quite the opposite of Guile which is taking up speed and just released Guile version 2.2.0, fully compatible with wisp (though wisp helped to find and fix one compiler bug, which is something I’m really happy about ☺).
Update (2017-02-05): Allan C. Webber presented my talk Natural script writing with Guile in the Guile devroom at FOSDEM. The talk was awesome — and recorded! Enjoy Natural script writing with Guile by "pretend Arne" ☺

presentation (pdf, 16 slides) and its source (org).
Have fun with wisp syntax!
Update (2016-07-12): wisp v0.9.1 released with a fix for multiline strings and many additional examples. For more info, see the NEWS file. To test it, install Guile 2.0.11 or later and bootstrap wisp:
wget https://bitbucket.org/ArneBab/wisp/downloads/wisp-0.9.1.tar.gz;
tar xf wisp-0.9.1.tar.gz ; cd wisp-0.9.1/;
./configure; make check;
examples/newbase60.w 123
If it prints 23 (123 in NewBase60), your wisp is fully operational.
That’s it - have fun with wisp syntax!
Update (2016-01-30): I presented Wisp in the Guile devroom at FOSDEM. The reception was unexpectedly positive — given some of the backlash the readable project got I expected an exceptionally sceptical audience, but people rather asked about ways to put Wisp to good use, for example in templates, whether it works in the REPL (yes, it does) and whether it could help people start into Scheme. The atmosphere in the Guile devroom was very constructive and friendly during all talks, and I’m happy I could meet the Hackers there in person. I’m definitely taking good memories with me. Sadly the video did not make it, but the schedule-page includes the presentation (pdf, 10 slides) and its source (org).
Have fun with wisp syntax!
Update (2016-01-04): Wisp is available in GNU Guix! Thanks to the package from Christopher Webber you can try Wisp easily on top of any distribution:
guix package -i guile guile-wisp
guile --language=wisp
This already gives you Wisp at the REPL (take care to follow all instructions for installing Guix on top of another distro, especially the locales).
Have fun with wisp syntax!
Update (2015-10-01): wisp v0.9.0 released which no longer depends on Python for bootstrapping releases (but ./configure still asks for it — a fix for another day). And thanks to Christopher Webber there is now a patch to install wisp within GNU Guix. For more info, see the NEWS file. To test it, install Guile 2.0.11 or later and bootstrap wisp:
wget https://bitbucket.org/ArneBab/wisp/downloads/wisp-0.9.0.tar.gz;
tar xf wisp-0.9.0.tar.gz ; cd wisp-0.9.0/;
./configure; make check;
examples/newbase60.w 123
If it prints 23 (123 in NewBase60), your wisp is fully operational.
That’s it - have fun with wisp syntax!
Update (2015-09-12): wisp v0.8.6 released with fixed macros in interpreted code, chunking by top-level forms, : . parsed as nothing, ending chunks with a trailing period, updated example evolve and added examples newbase60, cli, cholesky decomposition, closure and hoist in loop. For more info, see the NEWS file.To test it, install Guile 2.0.x or 2.2.x and Python 3 and bootstrap wisp:
wget https://bitbucket.org/ArneBab/wisp/downloads/wisp-0.8.6.tar.gz;
tar xf wisp-0.8.6.tar.gz ; cd wisp-0.8.6/;
./configure; make check;
examples/newbase60.w 123
If it prints 23 (123 in NewBase60), your wisp is fully operational.
That’s it - have fun with wisp syntax! And a happy time together for the ones who merge their paths today ☺
Update (2015-04-10): wisp v0.8.3 released with line information in backtraces. For more info, see the NEWS file.To test it, install Guile 2.0.x or 2.2.x and Python 3 and bootstrap wisp:
wget https://bitbucket.org/ArneBab/wisp/downloads/wisp-0.8.3.tar.gz;
tar xf wisp-0.8.3.tar.gz ; cd wisp-0.8.3/;
./configure; make check;
guile -L . --language=wisp tests/factorial.w; echo
If it prints 120120 (two times 120, the factorial of 5), your wisp is fully operational.
That’s it - have fun with wisp syntax!
Update (2015-03-18): wisp v0.8.2 released with reader bugfixes, new examples and an updated draft for SRFI 119 (wisp). For more info, see the NEWS file.To test it, install Guile 2.0.x or 2.2.x and Python 3 and bootstrap wisp:
wget https://bitbucket.org/ArneBab/wisp/downloads/wisp-0.8.2.tar.gz;
tar xf wisp-0.8.2.tar.gz ; cd wisp-0.8.2/;
./configure; make check;
guile -L . --language=wisp tests/factorial.w; echo
If it prints 120120 (two times 120, the factorial of 5), your wisp is fully operational.
That’s it - have fun with wisp syntax!
Update (2015-02-03): The wisp SRFI just got into draft state: SRFI-119 — on its way to an official Scheme Request For Implementation!
Update (2014-11-19): wisp v0.8.1 released with reader bugfixes. To test it, install Guile 2.0.x and Python 3 and bootstrap wisp:
wget https://bitbucket.org/ArneBab/wisp/downloads/wisp-0.8.1.tar.gz;
tar xf wisp-0.8.1.tar.gz ; cd wisp-0.8.1/;
./configure; make check;
guile -L . --language=wisp tests/factorial.w; echo
If it prints 120120 (two times 120, the factorial of 5), your wisp is fully operational.
That’s it - have fun with wisp syntax!
Update (2014-11-06): wisp v0.8.0 released! The new parser now passes the testsuite and wisp files can be executed directly. For more details, see the NEWS file. To test it, install Guile 2.0.x and bootstrap wisp:
wget https://bitbucket.org/ArneBab/wisp/downloads/wisp-0.8.0.tar.gz;
tar xf wisp-0.8.0.tar.gz ; cd wisp-0.8.0/;
./configure; make check;
guile -L . --language=wisp tests/factorial.w;
echo
If it prints 120120 (two times 120, the factorial of 5), your wisp is fully operational.
That’s it - have fun with wisp syntax!
On a personal note: It’s mindboggling that I could get this far! This is actually a fully bootstrapped indentation sensitive programming language with all the power of Scheme underneath, and it’s a one-person when-my-wife-and-children-sleep sideproject. The extensibility of Guile is awesome!
Update (2014-10-17): wisp v0.6.6 has a new implementation of the parser which now uses the scheme read function. `wisp-scheme.w` parses directly to a scheme syntax-tree instead of a scheme file to be more suitable to an SRFI. For more details, see the NEWS file. To test it, install Guile 2.0.x and bootstrap wisp:
wget https://bitbucket.org/ArneBab/wisp/downloads/wisp-0.6.6.tar.gz;
tar xf wisp-0.6.6.tar.gz; cd wisp-0.6.6;
./configure; make;
guile -L . --language=wisp
That’s it - have fun with wisp syntax at the REPL!
Caveat: It does not support the ' prefix yet (syntax point 4).
Update (2014-01-04): Resolved the name-clash together with Steve Purcell und Kris Jenkins: the javascript wisp-mode was renamed to wispjs-mode and wisp.el is called wisp-mode 0.1.5 again. It provides syntax highlighting for Emacs and minimal indentation support via tab. You can install it with `M-x package-install wisp-mode`
Update (2014-01-03): wisp-mode.el was renamed to wisp 0.1.4 to avoid a name clash with wisp-mode for the javascript-based wisp.
Update (2013-09-13): Wisp now has a REPL! Thanks go to GNU Guile and especially Mark Weaver, who guided me through the process (along with nalaginrut who answered my first clueless questions…).
To test the REPL, get the current code snapshot, unpack it, run ./bootstrap.sh, start guile with $ guile -L . (requires guile 2.x) and enter ,language wisp.
Example usage:
display "Hello World!\n"
then hit enter thrice.
Voilà, you have wisp at the REPL!
Caveeat: the wisp-parser is still experimental and contains known bugs. Use it for testing, but please do not rely on it for important stuff, yet.
Update (2013-09-10): wisp-guile.w can now parse itself! Bootstrapping: The magical feeling of seeing a language (dialect) grow up to live by itself: python3 wisp.py wisp-guile.w > 1 && guile 1 wisp-guile.w > 2 && guile 2 wisp-guile.w > 3 && diff 2 3. Starting today, wisp is implemented in wisp.
Update (2013-08-08): Wisp 0.3.1 released (Changelog).

Spaß mit import from in Python

→ Antwort auf Is it in this case : http://identi.ca/url/75523035 (see : [01:16]1 — Julien-Claude Fagot, die eine Antwort war auf One more reason why you should not use “from bla import foo”: print __import__(obs.__class__.__module__).__file__ — ArneBab

Datei: bla.py

def foo():
    print "bla"

Interaktiver Test:

\>>> import bla
\>>> bla.foo()
bla
\>>> def fu():
...   print "fu"
...
\>>> fu()
fu
\>>> from bla import foo
\>>> foo()
bla
\>>> bla.foo = fu
\>>> bla.foo()
fu
\>>> foo()
bla

Profifrage: Was passiert, wenn du from bla import foo nach bla.foo = fu ausführst?


  1. dsop: if you use 'bla.foo', then yes, you can assign to bla.foo and you'll see the change. If you do 'from bla import foo', then your locally imported 'foo' will not 'see' changes to bla.foo. 

Iteratoren als Filter

Für meine Plotroutinen brauche ich oft Funktionen, die eine Liste an Messwerten durchgehen und nur diejenigen zurückgeben, die einem bestimmten Kriterium entsprechen. Wenn dabei die Anzahl der Messwerte in die Millionen geht, kann alleine schon die Liste der ungefilterten Messwerte den Arbeitsspeicher des Rechners sprengen.

Ich könnte jetzt einfach eine Funktion schreiben, die alle Werte liest, filtert und nur die Relevanten zurückgibt.

Das könnte dann etwa so aussehen:

Reducing the Python startup time

The python startup time always nagged me (17-30ms) and I just searched again for a way to reduce it, when I found this:

The Python-Launcher caches GTK imports and forks new processes to reduce the startup time of python GUI programs.

Python-launcher does not solve my problem directly, but it points into an interesting direction: If you create a small daemon which you can contact via the shell to fork a new instance, you might be able to get rid of your startup time.

To get an example of the possibilities, downl

Read your python module documentation from emacs

I just found the excellent pydoc-info mode for emacs from Jon Waltman. It allows me to hit C-h S in a python file and enter a module name to see the documentation right away. If the point is on a symbol (=module or class or function), I can just hit enter to see its docs.

pydoc in action

def censor_the_net()

def censor_the_net():
  "wealth vs. democracy via media-control"
  try: SOPA() # see Stop Online Piracy Act 
  except Protest: # see sopastrike.com 
    try: PIPA() # see PROTECT IP Act 
    except Protest: # see weak links 
      try: OPEN() # see red herring 
      except Protest: 
        try: ACTA() # see Anti-Counterfeiting_Trade_Agreement 
        except Protest: # see resignation⁽¹⁾, court, vote anyway and advise against
          try: CISPA() # see Stop the Online Spying Bill 
          except Protest: # see Dangers
            try: CETA() # See Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement
            except Protest:  # see ePetition 50705
              try: TTIP() # See Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership
              except Protest: # see TTIP-Protest erreicht Brüssel
                try: TISA() # See Secret Trade in Services Agreement (TISA)
                except Protest: # see Unter Ausschluss der Öffentlichkeit
                  # destroy free speech and computers (english video).
                  do_it_anyway() 
while wealth_breeds_wealth and wealth_gives_power: # (german text and english video) # see wealth vs. democracy via media-control (german) censor_the_net()

pyRad is now in Gentoo portage! *happy*

My wheel type command interface pyRad just got included in the official Gentoo portage-tree!

So now you can install it in Gentoo with a simple emerge kde-misc/pyrad.

pyRad command wheel

turn files with wikipedia syntax to html (simple python script using mediawiki api)

I needed to convert a huge batch of mediawiki-files to html (had a 2010-03 copy of the now dead limewire wiki lying around). With a tip from RoanKattouw in #mediawiki@freenode.net I created a simple python script to convert arbitrary files from mediawiki syntax to html.

Usage:

  • Download the script and install the dependencies (yaml and python 3).

pyRad - a wheel type command interface for KDE

Arrrrrr! Ye be replacin' th' walk th' plank alt-tab wi' th' keelhaulin' pirate wheel, matey! — Lacrocivious

pyRad is a wheel type command interface for KDE1, designed to appear below your mouse pointer at a gesture.

install | setup | usage and screenshots | download and sources

pyRad command wheel


  1. powered by KDE 

pkgcore vs. eix → pix (find packages in Gentoo)

For a long time it bugged me, that eix uses a seperate database which I need to keep up to date. But no longer: With pkgcore as fast as it is today, I set up pquery to replace eix.

The result is pix:

alias pix='pquery --raw -nv --attr=keywords'

(put the above in your ~/.bashrc)

The output looks like this:

$ pix pkgcore
 * sys-apps/pkgcore
    versions: 0.5.11.6 0.5.11.7
    installed: 0.5.11.7
    repo: gentoo
    description: pkgcore package manager
    homepage: http://www.pkgcore.org
    keywords: ~alpha ~amd64 ~arm ~hppa ~ia64 ~ppc ~ppc64 ~s390 ~sh ~sparc ~x86

Spiele programmieren (Quellen)

Das hier ist eine kleine Auswahl an Quellen, um eigene Spiele zu programmieren. Sie ist nicht vollständig, sollte aber ausreichen, um direkt anfangen zu können. Sie enthält nur freie Programme.

Wenn du C++ programmieren kannst

Wenn du Python programmieren kannst

Wenn du nicht programmieren kannst

Mercurial vs. Bazaar speedtest clone and log - update: 4 runs with different versions

Some folks in #mercurial @ freenode.net just repeated the tests, so we have now a bit more stable data.

The evaluation shows the following:

  1. Initial clone: hg is about 4.4 times faster (about 2 min vs. 6 to 15 min)
  2. Repository sizes: the hg repo is about 1.92 smaller (~113M vs. 215M)
  3. Time for a full log: hg is about 2.36 times faster (~21s vs. ~50s)
  4. Time for annotating Misc/NEWS: hg is 1.5 times slower than bzr.
    Without the result from bzr-1.6.1 it is 2.6 times slower (~43s vs 17s).
  5. Integrity checking: hg is by several orders of magnitude faster than bzr which just took too long - everyone stopped it after varying time (30s to 17 min), because the output spoke of hours remaining, one had an integrity error. hg needed about 1 min.
  6. Local clone: hg is 11 times faster (39s vs. 7.14 min).
    Without the 1m15 result from the high disk load host it is 16 times faster (26s).
  7. Local clone with hot filesystem: hg is 14.9 times faster (26s vs. 6.5 min).
  8. Hot copy of just .bzr / .hg: The speeds are about equal, so the difference doesn't come from raw filesystem speed (2s).
  9. Additional Bazaar tests to check shared repository cloning performance (you only get this when you use a shared repository and only clone that shared repository): With shared repository and hardlinks bzr only needs about 5 seconds for cloning.

Geschwindigkeitstest - zwei Arten des for loops über tuples

Ich habe getestet, ob es einen Geschwindigkeitsunterschied zwischen zwei Arten des for loops über eine Liste von tuples gibt:

liste_von_tuples = [(1, 2), (3, 4), (5, 6)]

Es gibt 100.000 tuple, und jeder tuple enthält 2 Zufallszahlen.

Art 1:

for i in liste_von_tuples: 
   res.append(i[1])

Art 2:

for i, j in liste_von_tuples: 
   res.append(j)

Versionsverwaltungen testen - Mercurial (hg) und Bazaar (bzr)

Ich habe gerade einen sehr schönen Vergleich der Versionsverwaltungssysteme Mercurial und Bazaar gefunden.

Für alle, die sich nicht durch einen langen Artikel wühlen wolllen:

Mercurial ist in den meisten Tests 2-5x schneller als Bazaar.

Der volle Artikel:

http://sayspy.blogspot.com/2006/11/bazaar-vs-mercurial-unscientific.html

Falls ihr gerne eine Übersetzung der kritischen Teile hättet, schreibt es bitte.

Blob Valentine

Ein kleines Geschenk, das ich meiner Frau zum (bzw. am) Valentinstag 2008 geschrieben habe.

In seiner Gänze kann es allerdings in diesem Screenshot nicht genossen werden. Um das ganze animiert zu haben, musst du schon das Programm runterladen :) (es braucht nur Python (>=2.5) ).

Blob Valentine

-> Blob Valentine 0.3 herunterladen

With Python from the Shadows

- Written by Draketo aka Arne Babenhauserheide, originally to the melody of Moonlight Shadow on 22.2.08 but switched on 2008-06-27 to be able to put a recording under free licenses -


Audio-files: ogg
This recording is part of the music podcast singing in the winds of time.

Inhalt abgleichen
Willkommen im Weltenwald!



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